Zorba, Male Belly Dancer


Henna Design Resources, For These Sewing Machines Henna Design

Links, lite bulbs, and commonalities. Here is information that applies to more than one machine, so it has been combined on this page and referred to as appropriate...


Sewing Machine Links | Sewing Machine Bulb Study | Sewing Machine Wiring | Japanese JA and JC Numbers | Sears: Models, Makers, & YearsHarp Sizes


Sewing Machine Links

Keeping it short and simple. These links are where you can buy parts for some of the machines on these pages. I've had good luck with these, but no link constitutes an endorsement, use at your own risk!

A fairly long page, scroll down to what you need. It has "Rotary Motor Pulley #409" which will work on any of the friction drive machines on these pages, EXCEPT the Streamliner. Said "pulley" is not tapered like that machine requires, although modification of #409 is possible. This page also has the standard 15287-A bobbin winder tire as used on Singers and others; bobbins and bobbin cases for the 117.959 Kenmore and others. Worth exploring.

Old Rotary Parts.

Need a manual? Many are available free on the web, including several right here. However, not all are, or you may want a nicely printed and bound copy. I can recommend http://www.sewing-machine-manuals.com/. Linda, the proprietress is VERY knowledgable about old machines and she has manuals available for virtually everything - in both downloadable PDF and printed form.

Need other parts? This guy probably has them. He has an extensive listing of old machines he's parting out, email him with your needs. He's always been affordable, I've used him several times.

The belt for the Sewmatic is a #978 cogged V-belt from Sew Classic dot Com.

Need to pack a machine the RIGHT way to ship it? Refer to This (offsite) Page!

A great sewing machine blog: The Archaic and Arcane. Lots of repair and maintenance info & advice.

This guy shows how to sew various things, and does each project on a different machine: Thin Man Sewing.

This guy claims that his is the number one male sewing blog: Male Pattern Boldness.

Another vintage sewing machine blog: Steel Sewing.

More: Paul's Sewing Machines.

Needle info, a few manuals, and other miscellany: Kevin's Sewing Stuff.

I've made a couple of sewing machine bases, and repaired a few more, but this guy has it down to a science: How to Make a Custom Sewing Machine Case.


15 Watt Sewing Machine Lite Bulb Study:

This started as a search for the ideal light bulb for Nationals; especially the Reversew Rex and the Streamliner, but evolved slightly as the White 690 as well as the Sewmatic Chainstitcher use these very common threaded base bulbs. Maybe your machine does too!

Lite bulb
The Bulbs under discussion, from top:
15 Watt Nitelite/Christmas style
15 Watt equivalent LED "Silicon Bulb"
15 Watt #643 bulb
15 Watt super skinny bulb from Feit Electric.

Lite bulb
This is a picture of correct, no longer made, lite bulb as originally used in the
Reversew Rex and Streamliner.

Lite bulb
And here is this same "original" bulb compared with the Feit Electric product.

As arranged in the above picture, the largest is on top, graduating down to the smallest on the bottom. In general, any bulb can substitute for any of the bulb(s) above it in a size restricted area, such as the "Rex" and Streamliner - but the reverse isn't true unless there is more space available, such as in the White 690 or Sewmatic Chainstitcher where ANY of these bulbs can be utilized.

In the case of the two Nationals in question, I had been using a standard #643 bulb, although it was a VERY tight fit, especially in the "Rex". In both machines, the glass envelope of the bulb was touching metal, and again in the case of the "Rex", I had to screw it in place very carefully with a pair of needle nose pliers!

So when Randy discovered the ultra small/skinny Feit Electric 15 watt bulbs, they were a match made in heaven as they were actually smaller than the original! This bulb can be purchased at Home Depot, and is Feit Electric # BP15T4C/2 - I suspect the "/2" means two to a package. They are marketed as bulbs for picture lights and similar.

The Nitelite/Christmas style 15 watt bulb was probably the most common threaded bulb used in sewing machines from the 1930s forward, Nationals not withstanding. Machines with space for this bulb have the advantage of being able to use all the various smaller bulbs as well. Note that real Christmas lamps (or nite lite lamps) are only half the wattage (7½ vs. 15) of the identical looking type used in sewing machines. Some of this type are frosted, others clear.

I had been wanting an LED "bulb" for my main machine, a 1976 White 690, almost since the day I got it. Unfortunately, candelabra based LED bulbs came in three types: Nitelite sized, which would of course fit the 690, but also nitelite brightness (or less); Plenty bright, but chandelier sized - too big; and one seller on eBay was selling what looked like a crude home-made lashup for $30+!

So when the above pictured LED bulb appeared on eBay for less than $10, I bought one. It seems well made, and is cast in crystal clear silicon rubber. Its almost as small as the Feit Electric incandescent, and fits fine in the Nationals being discussed here. Its supposedly 25% brighter than the incandescent - I will say it certainly appears brighter and certainly isn't any dimmer - and best of all it only uses somewhere around 2 watts or a bit less, so it isn't so darn HOT. In fact, you can hold it when its been on for hours. Who actually makes this particular bulb is unknown, no identifying marks found on the packaging.

What follows is a "Bulb Study" I did, showing the #643, the Feit, and the LED bulb and how they fit and look in the two Nationals under consideration, and then a clear Christmas/Nitelite style and LED in the Sewmatic and White. All illumination comparisons taken under the same lighting conditions.

In the end, the LED now resides permanently in the White, the two Nationals have Feit bulbs, and the displaced #643s await re-use elsewhere and in the Sewmatic chainstitcher.

Lite bulb
#643 in a Streamliner

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern.

Lite bulb
The Feit in a Streamliner - plenty of room.

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern - same as the #643 as you'd expect.

Lite bulb
The LED in a Streamliner - still enough room although its a bit long.

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern - Brighter and whiter.

Lite bulb
#643 in a Reversew Rex faceplate

Lite bulb
End-on view - glass to metal contact.

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern.

Lite bulb
Feit in a Reversew Rex faceplate

Lite bulb
End-on view - no glass to metal contact!

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern - same as the #643 as you'd expect.

Lite bulb
LED in a Reversew Rex faceplate

Lite bulb
End-on view - no glass to metal contact! No rubber to metal contact either!

Lite bulb
And its illumination pattern - Brighter and whiter.

Moving on to the White 690 and the Sewmatic chainstitcher: As they both were engineered for use with a Christmas/nitelite bulb, no need to repeat for the #643 or Feit as they'd both fit with room to spare and the illumination patterns would be exactly the same.

Lite bulb
Sewmatic chainstitcher with Christmas/nitelite style.

Lite bulb
Its illumination pattern, nice and square.

Lite bulb
Now the LED in the Sewmatic...

Lite bulb
And a blaze of bright white lite!

Lite bulb
Christmas/nitelite style in the White.

Lite bulb
With its illumination pattern.

Lite bulb
LED in its forever home in the White.

Lite bulb
Also a blaze of bright white lite!

But What About...

Lite bulb
The Expert B.T.?

Bell Sewing Machine
The Micro-Bell?

99K Sewing Machine
The Singer 99K?

185K Sewing Machine
The Singer 185K?

Pfaff 776 Serger
The Pfaff 776 Serger?

Yes, it is possible to place new LED bulbs in all of these - the Expert BT in particular also originally utilized the Christmas/nitelite style, and had the LED bulb pictured here been available 2 years ago, I would have used one instead of doing a fairly major project to retrofit an entire LED light fixture onto this machine! But since that has been done, it will remain until such time - if ever - that this fixture dies, then I can re-install the original fixture with a new LED bulb in it. Everything is reversible!

The Micro-Bell uses an odd looking bulb indeed - shaped like a Christmas/nitelite type, but a double contact bayonet style that has been reflectorized on one side. That machine, as well as the "SingerLight" on the 99K should be able to use a double contact LED bulb that the same eBay seller - and doubtlessly others as well - also sells.

The TZ-17 uses an E17 based bulb, rather than the E12, but said larger bulbs are readily available in LED form these days. There is a brief discussion on the TZ-17 page.

That leaves the 185K. An entire bulb study was done on it a couple of years ago, available on the 185k page, shows how a standard candelabra based bulb - which would now include our featured LED bulb - can be used with an adapter. However, even that oddball bulb seems to be available in an LED version now.


Sewing Machine Wiring

NOTE WELL: These drawings and associated information are provided "as-is" and for reference ONLY. They are NOT guaranteed to be accurate, safe, foolproof, or anything else! In addition, there are other ways besides what's depicted here to wire a sewing machine. If you're not qualified, or not comfortable working with live AC voltages, find someone who is. VERIFY your machine's wiring before assuming anything about it. USE THESE DRAWINGS AND THIS INFORMATION AT YOUR OWN RISK!!

Below are diagrams for 4 common ways sewing machines are often found to be wired. These refer to 100 percent line voltage operated machines, the more modern machines using low voltage controls are beyond the scope of this page and are not covered here. In this context, "Controller" can mean either a foot controller or a knee controller; and it can be a wire wound resistive type, a "Carbon Pile" resistive type, or even a line voltage solid state style.


Sewing Machine wiring diagram
Click for "A" sized PDF version!

This is probably the most common wiring schema used on machines from the 1970s forward, as well as some older models. The "optional" lite switch will be present in most cases, and the "alternate switch wiring" will be seen on many newer machines, thus switching both the motor and the lite. My Pfaff 776 Serger is one such wired the latter version of this schema. The old Kenmore is an example of an older machine wired this way. DO NOTE: There may or may not be a pseudo-standard use of which pins are used for what - for that reason no pin numbers have been placed on the schematic! It will be necessary to ascertain how the pins are wired on the machine and match the external wiring accordingly!

Here is a link to a nicely done page showing 3 pin wiring with pin numbers for SINGERS. The diagram, while drawn differently, is the same as the one above, but having the pin numbers will help if you have a Singer. I still suggest verifying your machine against the provided pin numbers with an ohmmeter or visual tracing! LINK: Singer Wiring.


Sewing Machine wiring diagram
Click for "A" sized PDF version!

This alternate method of using a 3 pin connector has the advantage of not requiring a splice or 2 wires on one pin of the 3 pin connector. Instead the 2 conductor line cord goes directly to the foot pedal, and then a 3 conductor cord goes from the foot pedal to the machine. The Micro Bell is wired this way, and I rewired the SewMatic Chainstitcher to this schema as it resulted in a much cleaner wiring job. Any 3 pin system should be able to be wired this way if desired. DO NOTE: There may or may not be a pseudo-standard use of which pins are used for what - for that reason no pin numbers have been placed on the schematic! It will be necessary to ascertain how the pins are wired on the machine and match the external wiring accordingly!


Sewing Machine wiring diagram
Click for "A" sized PDF version!

National Sewing Machine Company (NSMCo) used this schema as their wiring standard for their entire history. It is, in my opinion, the neatest and cleanest way to wire one. You will note the relative gender of the two connectors. The connector for the controller is duplicated on the wiring block and on a pigtail under the machine - your machine may have the wiring block (foot pedal) connector blocked off. Some Nationals had light switches, some did not. I have not seen the "Alternate Switch Wiring" on a National, but have seen it alluded to in at least one NSMCo manual.


Sewing Machine wiring diagram
Click for "A" sized PDF version!

Lastly, this is type typical wiring schema used by most Japanese machines from the 1950s through at least the mid-70s, as my 1976 White 690 is wired this way. This is also a very good way to wire a machine, I retrofitted my Singer 99K to this schema during that machine's restoration. All the complexity is hidden inside the pre-wired double receptacle wiring block; the machine's motor and lite plug into the appropriately marked receptacles, a "mains plug" (as my British friends would call it) comes out one end of the block, and a wire pigtail that leads to the controller comes out the other end. The only caveat is if the motor and lite are plugged into the wrong receptacles, the motor will come on full blast but you'll have a light that varies intensity with the controller! I've never seen a machine wired this way that didn't have a light switch, the schema pretty much requires one. In fact, in the case of my White 690, there's a double pole switch that controls the motor as well.


Japanese JA and JC numbers

This reference has been "kicking around" on the 'net in various places and in various forms. This version has been highly expanded and revised from the original. It was pieced together from a list found on the Japanese Sewing Machine Yahoo! group, as well as several other sources including considerable personal research and observation. For reference only, no accuracy is expressed or implied, but updates are welcomed!

Note: JA-39 was indicated being badged as Kenmore in the original list. I'm not buying it until I see further confirmation. I was able to confirm JA-39 as being Toyota OEM. To the best of anyone's knowledge, Toyota never manufactured Kenmore sewing machines for Sears (UPDATE: Toyota is known to have manufactured non-Kenmore machines for the Canadian market), only Janome, Maruzen/Jaguar, and Soryu among the Japanese makers did so. However, we now have several "unknown" manufacturers for Kenmore as noted below, perhaps one of them actually is Toyota...

Nobody really knows exactly what these numbers mean, and it would probably take a native Japanese speaker to be able to visit the appropriate archives in Japan - if they still exist - to try to shed more light on the subject. However, I have observed:

  • No "JA/JC" numbers seem to appear on free arm machines, but same are harder to check and comparatively few have been.
  • Very seldom seen on Singer 15 clones.
  • "JC" numbers are ALWAYS cast into the bottom of the bed.
  • Not all Japanese machines have JA or JC numbers. Many have only one or the other or none. A given manufacturer may have used these numbers sporadically. Nobody knows the why or how of this...
  • Any OEM listed has only been so after POSITIVE identification, otherwise a question mark is put by the OEM name. To date, the working assumption is that only one OEM used each JA or JC number - but that assumption could be disproven at any time.
  • "JA" numbers, also found under the bed, are either stamped into the metal, stamped into an under-bed badge (sometimes as a serial number prefix), or they're inked stamped.

Except when they're not! This appears to have changed by the time of the aluminum era. "Kenmore" machines with "JA-4" (Maruzen) cast into (instead of stamped) the bottom of their aluminum bed are known to exist. These machines also show a "JC-4" cast right next to the "JA-4"! "JC-4" is a known Brother number. It is my current working theory, that "JC" refers to the company that CAST the machine hull, "JA" refers to the company that ASSEMBLED (designed?) the machine. This is PURE SPECULATION on my part.

In this case, it would appear to mean that Brother made the castings for Maruzen who then assembled the machines. Other (non-Kenmore) aluminum examples are known to exist with both JA and JC numbers cast in in a similar manner.

Kenmore Sewing Machine
Aluminum Kenmore
158.16012 with cast in "JA" number in addition to the usual cast in "JC"

Listed next to the JA or JC number is the OEM manufacturer, if known, then under the "Badged as" heading are any known badgings the finished machine was sold under. JA/JC numbers are generally found in the form of "J-Axx" or "J-Cxx", but are listed here as "JA-xx" and "JC-xx" as that seems to be the accepted way to list them on the Internet. There are also very rarely seen "JN" and "HA" numbers, no-one seems to know what those mean other than "HA-1" indicates a Japanese round bobbin straight stitch machine. Apparently not manufacturer specific. I've seen occasional other HA-xx numbers, including HA003 cast onto the bottom of a Morse badged straight stitch machine built by Toyota.

JA Number			Badged as
---------			---------
JA-1  Brother			Brother, Electro Grand, Bico, Lemair (Australia), Riviera
JA-2  Janome			New Home
JA-3  Riccar			Riccar, Morse, Zenith, Gimbel's, American Home
				Hilton Adler, Belvedere Adler
JA-4  Maruzen			Kenmore
JA-5  Sanwa?			Penncrest (J.C. Penney), Brother, Nelco, Lemair (Australia)
JA-6  Happy?			Morse (HA-1), Morse, Bel Air, Aldens
JA-7  Toyota			Morse
JA-8  Pine			Singer
JA-9  Happy?			Morse (HA-1), Viking (Eaton, NOT the Swedish Viking)
JA-10 Happy			Signature (Montgomery Ward), Nelco
JA-11				Union Peters
JA-12 Brother			American Beauty, Regency, Nelco
				Good Housekeeper
JA-13 Koyo			Seammaster, Dressmaker, American Beauty
				Aldens, Cameo, Stradivaro, The White House
				La Modista, Keystone, Universal
JA-15 FMK			White
JA-16				Nelco, Sew Best, Jolsen, Brother
JA-17				Imperial
JA-18 Toyota			American Beauty
JA-19 Toyota			Calanda, Morse, Hamilton, Dial-A-Stitch
				Dressmaker, Household, Fleetwood
JA-20 Brother?			White, The White House, Premier, Hilton
				Home Mark
JA-21 Soryu?			Fleetwood, Emdeko, National, Kenmore
				Home Maker, Stradivaro
JA-22 Soryu			Kenmore
JA-23				White, Domestic, Sewmatic
JA-25				Victor, Dressmaker
JA-27				Morse
JA-28 Brother			Brother, Lemair (Australia)
JA-29 Brother			Wizard, Lemair Helvetia (Australia)
JA-30 Janome			New Home
JA-34 				Riccar, American Beauty
JA-35 Happy			Signature (Montgomery Ward)
JA-36				Vornado, Adler, Dressmaker
JA-38 Sanshin			Classic, Remington, Nelco, Marvel
				Penncrest, Dressmaker, Regency
				Fleetwood, Good Housekeeper, Alco
				Universal, Jolsen
JA-39 Toyota			Morse, Liebermann, Sew Best
JA-43				Idle Hour
JA-47				National (Long Shuttle), Universal
				White, Morse, Dressmaker, Kenmore
				New Home, Crosley
JA-48				Lemair (Australia)
JA-58 Yamazaki			Dressmaker, Universal
JA-61				Dressmaker
JA-84				Imperial
JA-107				Brother
JA-109				Fairline (Tentative, verification needed)


JC Number Badged as --------- --------- JC-1 Brother Brother, Bradford, Wizard, Electro Grand Riviera, Bico, Lemair (Australia) JC-2 Sanshin Morse, Nelco, White, Domestic, Atlas Visetti, Stradivaro, Aldens, Brother Sew Best, Jolsen, Dressmaster, Emdeko Fleetwood JC-3 Janome Janome, New Home JC-4 Brother American Beauty, Riccar, Tessler, Kenmore Household, Dressmaker, Good Housekeeper JC-5 FMK Dial N Sew, Liebermann, Sew Best, Necchi-Alco Nelco, Kenmore JC-6 Riccar Riccar, Belvedere Adler JC-7 Morse, White JC-8 Janome New Home JC-9 Remington, Modern Home, White, Victor, Hilton Bamberger's, Spiegel "Vogue Stitch" JC-10 Viking (Eaton, NOT the Swedish Viking) JC-12 Happy Signature (Montgomery Ward), Dressmaker JC-13 Singer JC-15 Brother, Olympia JC-16 Maruzen Kenmore JC-18 Janome New Home JC-19 Brother? White, Dressmaker, Home Mark JC-23 Domestic, Dressmaker, Nelco, Lemair (Australia) JC-26 Electro Grand JC-27 Cameo, American Home JC-28 Sanshin Emdeko, Penncrest, Capitol, Gimbels, Fleetwood JC-29 White, Morse JC-30 Jones JC-31 Matsushita? Dressmaker, Imperial, Belvedere Adler, Adler JC-34 Universal, Morse, Domestic New Home, Crosley JC-36 Sanshin Dressmaker, Nelco, Penncrest, Jolson JC-39 Sewmatic JC-41 Belvedere


Sears Sewing Machine listing of Years

Similar to the JA/JC listing (above), this listing of Sears models and their years of manufacture is found in various locales on the 'net. There are several model number prefixes, manufactured as follows:


116: Unknown (A Kenmore model 116.531 has been reported, supposedly from 1955 although how that was determined is unknown)
117: White
119: Unknown (119.401 Chainstitcher reported.)
120: New Process Gear, Div. Chrysler Corp.
148: Soryu
151: Unknown (Example 151.271 badged as "Sears Commander", NOT "Kenmore")
153: Unknown (A Sears "Challenge" 153.272 reported, appears to be a Japanese 15 clone. 153 has been reported as Riccar.)
158: Maruzen cum Jaguar
159: Unknown (Kenmore 159.262 on a 1950s looking VS Machine - JA-47, as well as 159.260 on another VS machine, unknown provenance.)
385: Janome
516: Gritzner-Kayser

The list is sorted by model NUMBER, not the model NAME (which was actually a number except on the very earliest machines), which was often repeated or re-used. No warranty expressed or implied as to the accuracy or completeness of this data.

Model Name 					Model Number		Years Produced
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
????						116.531				1955
Kenmore Standard Rotary				117.101				1934
Kenmore Rotary					117.109				1934
Kenmore Rotary					117.111				1939
Franklin Rotary					117.113				1939
Franklin Rotary					117.1131				1948
Franklin Rotary					117.115				1939
Franklin Rotary					117.1151				1948
Kenmore Rotary					117.119				1939
Kenmore Rotary					117.1191				1948
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.121				1939
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.123				1939
Kenmore Rotary					117.127				----
Kenmore Rotary					117.141				1948
Kenmore Rotary					117.159				----
Kenmore Rotary					117.169				1950
Kenmore Rotary					117.179				----
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.21				1948
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.217				----
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.227				----
Kenmore Rotary					117.231				1954
Kenmore						117.251				1954
Kenmore						117.252				1954
Kenmore						117.253				1954
Kenmore Long Shuttle				117.26				1938
Minnesota "E"					117.28				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.29				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.291				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.300				----
Franklin Rotary					117.301				----
Challenge Long Shuttle				117.32				1938
Franklin Long Shuttle				117.34				1938
Kenmore Long Shuttle				117.36				1954
Kenmore Long Shuttle				117.361				1954
Minnesota "E"					117.38				1939
Franklin						117.4				1938
Challenge Long Shuttle				117.40				1939
Franklin Rotary					117.41				1943
Franklin Long Shuttle				117.42				1939
Kenmore Long Shuttle				117.46				1939
Minnesota "E"					117.48				1939
Challenge Long Shuttle				117.50				1939
Franklin Long Shuttle				117.52				1939
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.55				1938
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.551				1938
Kenmore Rotary					117.552				1954
Kenmore Rotary					117.560				1955
Kenmore Rotary					117.569				1955
Kenmore						117.580				1954
Kenmore						117.581				1959
Kenmore						117.582				1959
Kenmore						117.583				1959
Kenmore (or) Kenmore Imperial Rotary		117.59				1938
Kenmore (or) Kenmore Imperial Rotary "Football"	117.591				1942
Kenmore (or) Kenmore Supreme Rotary		117.592				1948
Kenmore Rotary					117.600				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.61				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.611				1938
Accessory Motor					117.617				1949
Accessory Motor					117.618				1949
Accessory Motor					117.619				1949
Kenmore Long Shuttle				117.62				1948
Accessory Motor					117.620				1949
Accessory Motor					117.621				1949
Accessory Motor					117.622				1949
Kenmore Standard Rotary				117.63				1938
Kenmore Standard Rotary				117.631				1938
						117.640 (64)			1955
Kenmore						117.641				1955
Kenmore Rotary					117.65				1938
Kenmore Rotary					117.651				1938
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.67				1938
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.671				1938
						117.700				1954
						117.720				1957
Kenmore ZigZag Automatic				117.740				1956
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.81				1938
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.811				1938
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.812				1948
Kenmore Deluxe Rotary				117.813				1954
Kenmore Model 83					117.83				1938
Kenmore Model 83					117.831				1938
Kenmore						117.840				1956
Kenmore						117.841				1958
Franklin Deluxe					117.85				1938
Franklin Deluxe					117.851				1938
Franklin Deluxe					117.857				1938
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.87				1938
Franklin Deluxe Rotary				117.871				1938
Kenmore Rotary Model "A"				117.89				1938
Kenmore Rotary Model "A"				117.891				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.91				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.911				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.93				1938
Franklin Rotary					117.931				1938
Kenmore 95 Rotary				117.95				1948
Kenmore 95 Rotary				117.959				1948
Kenmore						117.97				1952
Accessory Motor					117.9729				1939
Accessory Motor					117.97291			1940
Accessory Motor					117.9730				----
Accessory Motor					117.97301			1940
Accessory Motor					117.9731				1941
Accessory Motor					117.97311			1940
????						119.401				1950s?
49						120.490				1950
49						120.491				1954
49						120.492				1954
49						120.60756			----
Decorator Attachment				120.60763			----
Buttonhole Attachment				120.60766			----
71						120.710				1955
71						120.711				1958
71						120.712				1958
71						120.713				1958
71						120.714				1958
76						120.760				1960-62
76						120.761				1960-62
1100						148.11000			1969-70
1101						148.11010			1969
1102						148.11020			1970
1104						148.11040			1970-71
1105						148.11050			1970-71
1114						148.11140			1971-72
1115						148.11150			1971
1117						148.11170			1971
1201						148.12010			1968
1201						148.12011			----
1203						148.12030			1968
1204						148.12040			1961-71
1205						148.12050			1970-71
1205						148.12051			1970-71
1206						148.12060			1969-70
1207						148.12070			1969-70
1207						148.12071			1970-71
1213						148.12130			1972
1214						148.12140			1971-72
1215						148.12150			1971
1216						148.12160			1971-72
1217						148.12170			1971-72
1218						148.12180			1971-72
1218						148.12181			1972-73
1218						148.12182			1974
1219						148.12190			1972-73
1219						148.12191			1973
1220						148.12200			1972-74
1220						148.12201			1975-76
1221						148.12210			1973-74
1222						148.12220			----
1240						148.12400			1974-75
1250						148.12500			1974
1250						148.12501			1974
1300						148.13000			1968-70
1302						148.13020			----
1302						148.13021			1968
1302						148.10322			1968-71
1302						148.10323			1971
1310						148.13100			1974
1310						148.13101			1974-75
1311						148.13110			1975-75
1322						148.13220			1972-73
1422						148.14220			1972-73
1422						148.14221			1973
1521						148.15210			1978
1560						148.15600			1976-78
1937						148.19370			1976
1937						148.19371			1976-77
1937						148.19372			1977-78
20						148.200				1963-65
21						148.210				1963-66
23						148.230				1966
23						148.231				1966-67
27						148.270				1957-58
27						148.272				1958-59
27						148.273				1959-62
27						148.274				----
28						148.280				1960-63
28						148.281				1963-65
29						148.290				1960
29						148.291				1960
29						148.292				1960-61
29						148.293				1961
29						148.294				1961-63
29						148.295				1963-66
29						148.296				1966-67
39						148.390				1957
39						148.391				1957
39						148.392				1957-60
39						148.393				1960
39						148.394				1961
39						148.395				1961
40						148.400				1961-62 & 1967
42						148.420				1967
53						148.530				1966-67
53						148.531				1967
86						148.860				1958-59
86						148.861				1959-62
87						148.870				1961
1570						148.15700			1978
27						148.271				1957-58
87						148.871				1963
87						148.872				1963
Commander					151.271				1950s/1960s?
Challenge					153.272				1950s?
1020						158.10200			1971-72
1030						158.10300			1970
1030						158.10301			1970-71
1030						158.10302			1971-73
1030						158.10304			1974-75
1040						158.10400			1971-73
1040						158.10401			1973
1040						158.10402			1974-75
1045						158.10450			1976
1050						158.10500			1974
1050						158.10501			1974-75
1060						158.10600			1977
1060						158.10601			1977-80
1069						158.10690			1979
1069						158.10691			1979
1069						158.10692			1980
12						158.120				1965-66
1200						158.12000			1968-70
1202						158.12020			1968
12						158.121				1966
1211						158.12110			1977
1211						158.12111			1979
1212						158.12120			----
1225						158.12250			1974
1226						158.12260			----
1227						158.12270			----
1227						158.12271			----
1231						158.12310			1977
1231						158.12311			----
1231						158.12312			----
1237						158.12370			----
1241						158.12410			----
1241						158.12411			----
1247						158.12470			1975
1247						158.12471			----
1247						158.12472			----
1251						158.12510			----
1251						158.12511			----
1252						158.12520			----
13						158.130				1965-67
1310						158.13010			1968
1301						158.13011			1968-69
1303						158.13030			1969
1303						158.13031			1969
1303						158.13032			1969
1211						158.12112			1985 ?
1303						158.13033			1969-71
1304						158.13040			1969
1304						158.13041			1970
1305						158.13050			1971
1315						158.13150			1971-72
1316						158.13160			1971-72
1317						158.13170			1972-73
1318						158.13180			1972-73
1319						158.13190			----
1320						158.13200			1973-74
1320						158.13201			1974-75
1325						158.13250			----
1336						158.13360			1977
1341						158.13410			----
1347						158.13470			1975-77
1347						158.13471			----
1351						158.13510			----
1357						158.13571			----
1358						158.13580			----
14						158.140				1965
1400						158.14000			1969-71
1400						158.14001			1971
1400						158.14002			1971-72
1400						158.14003			1973
1410						158.14100			1971-72
1410						158.14101			1972-73
1430						158.14300			1973-74
1430						158.14301			1974-75
1431						158.14310			1975-76
1451						158.14510			1976-77
15						158.150				1965
1500						158.15000			1968-69
1501						158.15010			1968
1503						158.15030			1969-71
1504						158.15040			1970-71
15						158.151				1966
1514						158.15140			1971
1515						158.15150			1975 & 77
1516						158.15160			1971-72 & 1977
15						158.152				1967
1525						158.15250			----
1525						158.15251			----
1551						158.15510			----
1581						158.15810			----
16						158.160				1965
1600						158.16000			1968
1600						158.16001			1968
1601						158.16010			1969
1601						158.16011			1969-70
1601						158.16012			1970-71
1601						158.16013			1971
1602						158.16020			1971-72
1602						158.16021			1973
1603						158.16030			1971-72
1603						158.16031			1973
16						158.161				----
16						158.162				----
1621						158.16210			1976
1625						158.16250			1977
16						158.163				1967
1641						158.16410			----
1649						158.16490			----
1650						158.16500			1968-69
1651						158.16510			1968-69
1652						158.16520			1968-69
1653						158.16530			1968
1654						158.16540			1969-71
1660						158.16600			1976-77
1680						158.16800			----
1680						158.16801			----
1690						158.16900			----
1700						158.17000			1968
1700						158.17001			1968
1701						158.17010			1969
1701						158.17011			1969
1701						158.17012			1970
1703						158.17030			1972
1703						158.17031			1972
1703						158.17032			1973
1703						158.17033			1973-74
1720						158.17200			1975
1730						158.17300			1975
1731						158.17310			----
1749						158.17490			1968
1750						158.17500			1968
1750						158.17501			1968-69
1750						158.17501			1968-69
1751						158.17510			1968
1751						158.17511			1968-69
1752						158.17520			1968-69
1753						158.17530			1969-70
1754						158.17540			1969-70
1755						158.17550			1970-71
1756						158.17560			1971-72
1757						158.17570			1972
1757						158.17571			1972
1757						158.17572			----
1760						158.17600			1976-77
1774						158.17740			1974
1774						158.17741			1974-75
1780						158.17800			----
1781						158.17810			----
1800						158.18000			1968
1801						158.18010			1968
1801						158.18011			1968-69
1802						158.18020			1968
1802						158.18021			1968-69
1802						158.18022			1969
1802						158.18023			1970-71
1802						158.18024			1971-72
1803						158.18030			1971-72
1803						158.18031			1972
1803						158.18032			1973
1803						158.18033			1973-74
1803						158.18034			1974
1813						158.18130			1974
1813						158.18131			1974-75
1814						158.18140			1974
1814						158.18141			1974-75
1815						158.18150			1976-77
1880						158.18800			1977
1913						158.19130			1976
1914						158.19140			1975
1914						158.19141			1975-76
1914						158.19142			1976-77
1931						158.19310			1976
1931						158.19311			1976
1940						158.19400			1975
1941						158.19410			1975-76
1941						158.19411			1976
1941						158.19412			1977
1946						158.19460			1976
1946						158.19461			1977
1947						158.19470			1975-76
1947						158.19471			1977
1980						158.19800			1977
1980						158.19801			1977
1980						158.19802			----
22						158.220				1966-67
22						158.221				1967
32						158.320				1963
32						158.321				1963-65
33						158.330				1966-67
33						158.331				1967
34						158.340				1962
34						158.341				1962
34						158.342				1963
34						158.343				1964
35						158.350				1957
35						158.351				1957-58
35						158.352				1957-59
35						158.353				1959-60
37						158.370				1957
37						158.371				1957
37						158.372				1957-59
37						158.373				1959
43						158.430				1961-62
43						158.431				1963
43						158.432				1963
43						158.433				1964-66
44						158.440				1957-58
44						158.441				1958-59
44						158.442				1959-60
44						158.443				1960
44						158.444				1961
44						158.445				1961
45						158.450				1958
46						158.460				1958-59 & 1961
46						158.461				1960
46						158.462				1960-61
46						158.463				1961-62
47						158.470				1958-62
47						158.471				1961-62
47						158.472				1963-64
48						158.480				1959-62
48						158.481				1963-64
50						158.500				1960-61
50						158.501				1961-62
50						158.502				1961
50						158.503				1962
50						158.504				1963-65
50						158.505				----
52						158.521				----
89						518.890				1958-59 (62?)


Harp Sizes:

I have some kind of fetish for compiling useless data, and making a table for it. This is a listing of harp sizes, AKA the distance from the pillar to the needle (as measured at the bed level), of the machines found on this site. Presented in no particular order:

Machine Year Size Class Pillar to Needle distance (Inches)
Singer VS2 1891 Full (4/4) 7-15/16
Wartheim Class 12 1900 Fullish (4/5) 6-1/2
Streamliner 1940s Full (4/4) 7-3/4
Kenmore 117.959 1940s Full+ (5/4) 7-1/16
Kenmore 158.16012zz 1970 Full (4/4) 7-3/8
White 690zz 1976 Full (4/4) 7.00
Reversew "Rex" 1950s2 3/4 6-5/16
Reversew "B" 1940s2 Full (4/4) 7-11/16
Expert B.T. 1940s3 3/4 6-5/16
Singer 99K 19571 3/4 6-1/4
Singer 185K 1960 3/4 6-1/4
Singer 15K 1929 Full (4/4) 6-7/8
Micro-Bell 1952 1/4 4-3/4
Sewmatic 1950 3/4 5-3/4
Toyota TZ-17zz 1950s (Full) 4/4 7.00
"Year" is best guess for the particular example encountered.
1 Produced from 1911 until 1963.
2 Produced from the 1930s until 1954.
3 Produced from "the treadle age" until 1950.
zz Zig Zag machine measured to leftmost needle position.

The real surprise here is the Singer VS2. It has a whopping needle to pillar distance only 1/16" short of EIGHT inches - beating out all of the other (listed) "Full Sized" machines!

Pillar shape can influence these measurements as well since the measurement is taken right at the bed level. Most older machines curve in considerably as the pillar reaches the bed, causing a narrower measurement. Higher up, they're wider. On the other hand, most modern machines are perfectly straight up and down in this area! Smile!

 

 

  Sewing Machine


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